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estiqlal:

Anaar Az Arghandab 

Kandahari Aesthetics

dialogueofdreamers:

Mohsen Makhmalbaf, سکوت The Silence (1998)

ancientart:

The 65m-tall Minaret of Jam, marks probably the site of the ancient city of Firuzkuh (later destroyed by the Mongol Ogodï in 1222), which was the capital of the Ghurid dynasty which ruled Afghanistan as well as from Kashgar to the Persian Gulf, and parts of northern Indian. Sultan Ghiyas ud-Din is named as the current Ghurid emperor at the time of construction by the inscription, which also gives a construction date of 1194.

The Minaret of Jam is sometimes called the ‘Victory Tower’, as it is probable that it was constructed to commemorate his 1192 victory at Deihi over the Empire of Ghaznavid. The site is also thought to have once been the summer residence of the Ghurid Emperors. The Minaret is significant for its decoration and architecture, representing the culmination of an architectural and artistic tradition in this region, and is covered in blue, incredibly elaborate brickwork and inscriptions (photo 2). A marvel from an art historical perspective, the Minaret of Jam represents the incredible artistic creativity and mastery of structural engineering of the time, and remains one of the very few so well preserved.

Sections from the inscriptions:

The uppermost band consists of the Muslim confession of faith; “I bear witness there is no god but Allah (and that) Muhammad is the messenger of Allah.”

Below this, are upper two bands that consists of verse 13, surat al-Saff LXI;”Help from Allah and present victory. Give good tidings (O Muhammad) to believers. O ye who believe.”

An inscription, “Abu’l-Fath”, heavily damaged, due to being made of stucco.

Facing north is a Kufic inscription, “On the date of the year five hundred ninety" (equivalent of 27 December 1193 to 16 December 1194).

Reference: Ghaznavid and Ghūrid Minarets, Ralph Pinder-Wilson, Iran, pg168-169.

Photos courtesy & taken by James Gordon. When writing this post UNESCO was of great use.

science-of-noise:

polyglotted:

forgetfuldepths:

kchikurdi:

Pre-Islamic Kurdish Alphabet

Whoa! Very interesting. I always thought it would look like Middle-Persian but it’s more similar to Manichaen.

Can anyone verify this? I’m not saying it’s not real… but as far as scripts go, it has very little uniformity. I’d just like some verification. (While looking for verification, I’m being forced to try and read Kurdish…. *sighs for not knowing Kurdish*)
Also, this looks nothing like Manichean (well certain parts look like the Manichaean from Fihrist al-Nadim, but it looks nothing like Manichaean Sogdian) or Middle Persian… just saying

I can’t really find any reliable source that says Kurdish ever had a proprietary script. It’s used variants of Perso-Arabic, Cyrillic, Armenian, and Latin, but I can’t find anything that looks like this.

That was always my understanding of Kurdish writings systems. The only place I could find images similar to this was in a Wikipedia discussion. He essentially says that even if Kurdish used this, it wasn’t a native Kurdish script. So it’s not a “Kurdish Alphabet”. Additionally he makes a reference to Hurrian and Luwian, but I don’t think this looks like either one. He sources 3 books in Kurdish and one PDF (page 4 discusses Kurdish scripts, but it’s in Kurdish). 
So… I’m not really sure where to stand on it all… Mostly cuz I can’t read that Kurdish PDF and it actually has another version of this image in it (otherwise, this image is nowhere to be found).

science-of-noise:

polyglotted:

forgetfuldepths:

kchikurdi:

Pre-Islamic Kurdish Alphabet

Whoa! Very interesting. I always thought it would look like Middle-Persian but it’s more similar to Manichaen.

Can anyone verify this? I’m not saying it’s not real… but as far as scripts go, it has very little uniformity. I’d just like some verification. (While looking for verification, I’m being forced to try and read Kurdish…. *sighs for not knowing Kurdish*)

Also, this looks nothing like Manichean (well certain parts look like the Manichaean from Fihrist al-Nadim, but it looks nothing like Manichaean Sogdian) or Middle Persian… just saying

I can’t really find any reliable source that says Kurdish ever had a proprietary script. It’s used variants of Perso-Arabic, Cyrillic, Armenian, and Latin, but I can’t find anything that looks like this.

That was always my understanding of Kurdish writings systems. The only place I could find images similar to this was in a Wikipedia discussion. He essentially says that even if Kurdish used this, it wasn’t a native Kurdish script. So it’s not a “Kurdish Alphabet”. Additionally he makes a reference to Hurrian and Luwian, but I don’t think this looks like either one. He sources 3 books in Kurdish and one PDF (page 4 discusses Kurdish scripts, but it’s in Kurdish).

So… I’m not really sure where to stand on it all… Mostly cuz I can’t read that Kurdish PDF and it actually has another version of this image in it (otherwise, this image is nowhere to be found).

forgetfuldepths:

kchikurdi:

Pre-Islamic Kurdish Alphabet

Whoa! Very interesting. I always thought it would look like Middle-Persian but it’s more similar to Manichaen.

Can anyone verify this? I’m not saying it’s not real… but as far as scripts go, it has very little uniformity. I’d just like some verification. (While looking for verification, I’m being forced to try and read Kurdish…. *sighs for not knowing Kurdish*)
Also, this looks nothing like Manichean (well certain parts look like the Manichaean from Fihrist al-Nadim, but it looks nothing like Manichaean Sogdian) or Middle Persian… just saying

forgetfuldepths:

kchikurdi:

Pre-Islamic Kurdish Alphabet

Whoa! Very interesting. I always thought it would look like Middle-Persian but it’s more similar to Manichaen.

Can anyone verify this? I’m not saying it’s not real… but as far as scripts go, it has very little uniformity. I’d just like some verification. (While looking for verification, I’m being forced to try and read Kurdish…. *sighs for not knowing Kurdish*)

Also, this looks nothing like Manichean (well certain parts look like the Manichaean from Fihrist al-Nadim, but it looks nothing like Manichaean Sogdian) or Middle Persian… just saying

polyglotted:

عيد مبارك لكل التابعين! كل عام وأنتم بألف خير

عید مبارک برای همهٔ دنبالگرانم

Ид муборак барои ҳамаи хонандагони тоҷикиям!

اختر مو مبارک شه شاګردونه مې ته 

Hayitingiz muborak!

Bayramınız kutlu olsun!

(I apologize for any mistakes, and for the fact that I couldn’t write “to/for my followers” in Uzbek and Turkish, and for that fact that I didn’t write this in Turkmen, Urdu, or Kurdish - sorry)

جان‎/jan/jān/jaan [jan]

-

(noun) Jan/jaan is one of those specials words which lends itself across cultures and languages as a term of endearment and affection meaning, love, dear, heart, and life in East Asia. Arab/Persian: In Arabic, jan represents beloved one or dear. The Persian origins of this word mean life, equivalent to the Punjabi and Hindi definition. Calling a person your jaan, in comparison to the Arab and Persian culture, in South East Asian countries is an act of true love and intimiacy, and not used as liberally as the Persian connotation. Its true origins stem from Sanskrit. In Urdu you often refer to your lover and those your are close to as “meri jaan [meh-ree jan],” also meaning my life, and my dear. It has a deeper emotional meaning than merely calling someone your love, or sweetheart; it is used in the essence of true love (via spinals)

————-

I don’t know the OP on this post, but جان in Arabic has nothing to do with any of these meanings. Persian? Yes. Urdu? Yes. Hindi? Yes. Turkic languages now? Yes. But Arabic…. ….. ….. No. (Arabic-speaking followers, I am right here, right?)

Also, those IPA brackets at the end? What’s written inside of them would be “yan”… جان in IPA is more likely to be [dʒan] or [dʒɑn] or even [dʒɒn] depending on your language and dialect.

(Source: wordsnquotes.com)

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

notallwugs:

Two scientists walk into a bar:

"I’ll have an H2O."

"I’ll have an H2O, too."

The bartender gives them both water because he is able to distinguish the boundary tones that dictate the grammatical function of homonyms in coda position as well as pragmatic context.

Parz Lake #nofilter #parzlake #armenia  (at Parz Lich)

Parz Lake #nofilter #parzlake #armenia (at Parz Lich)